BLOOD TRACKING TIPS

BLOOD TRACKING TIPS

One of the most sought after blood trackers in the hunting industry is Tracker John. Tracker John spends several months a year tracking big bucks in the heart of the Midwest. He tracks deer for many of today’s top celebrities, including the Drury’s. It is safe to say he knows a thing or two about tracking deer after the shot. Below are a few tips from Tracker John that may help increase the odds of a successful recovery.

THE ENTRY WOUND

John believes every hunter should try to determine where they hit the deer. “When a hunter takes a shot, they are often so excited that they forget to pay close attention to where they hit the deer,” Tracker John explained. “Most hunters want to believe they made a good hit and often tell me they made a good shot, but that is often not the case.


It is important to know where the arrow or the bullet hit the deer so we can determine how long after the shot we should wait before going to look for the deer. Every hunter should look closely after they shoot to see if they can spot blood, the arrow, or any other clues that will help them put the pieces of the puzzle together when looking for the deer.”


WHICH WAY DID THE DEER RUN

Tracker John says every hunter should watch the deer as it runs off and try to notice any landmarks that will help him know where to start looking for blood. “It is easy to take a shot and then forget about watching the deer as it runs off. Knowing which direction it went after the shot will give the hunter (or me) and the dogs a good starting point. Finding a deer is often easier if we start in the right spot.


If possible, it is always good if a hunter looks at their surroundings the moment they climb into their stand and look at the travel corridors that the deer will likely use when entering and exiting the area. Look at the shooting lanes and other markers that will make locating where the deer ran after the shot easier. Finding the first blood is extremely important. Finding that blood is easier if a hunter knows how the deer exited the area after the shot.”


MANAGE THE TRAIL PROPERLY

Another thing Tracker John tells everyone who calls him is to manage the trail properly. “The moment a hunter thinks they are going to want to call in a tracking dog, they should back out of the trail and call the dog in. Many hunters keep looking for their deer even after they know they have a problem and in the process, make tracking the deer harder because they can compromise the blood trail by getting blood on their boots or by bringing too many friends into the woods with them so they miss blood or get blood on their boots. These trail conditions make it harder for a dog to follow the trail. I tell hunters to mark blood with toilet paper and call in a tracker the moment they think there is a problem.”


Blood tracking dogs are extremely popular now and finding one to help track a deer isn’t extremely difficult. That said, not all tracking dogs are created equal. To give a dog the best odds of recovering a deer after a shot, hunters should try to remember the tips above.

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